Writing Workshop
Writing
Lucy Calkins
Types of Writing:
1st Marking Period- Narrative- Realistic Fiction
2nd Marking Period- Opinion- Personal and Persuasive Essays
3rd Marking Period- Opinion- Writing about Fiction- The Literary Essay
4th Marking Period- Informational- Nonfiction
Writing Process:
* Brainstorming, Rough Drafts, Revising, Editing, and Publishing
-Writer’s Notebooks
Assessments:
Pretest and Posttest
Grading- Rubrics- Points
1 point- Grade 2
1.5 points- mid level
2 points- Grade 3
2.5 points-mid level
3 points- Grade 4
3.5 points- mid level
4 points- Grade 5
Rubric for Narrative Writing
Structure
* Overall- The writer wrote the important part of an event bit by bit and took out unimportant parts.
* Lead- The writer wrote a beginning in which he showed what was happening and where, getting readers into the world of the story.
* Transitions-The writer showed how much time went by with words and phrases that mark time such as just then and suddenly (to show when things happened quickly) or after a while and a little later (to show when a little time passed). 
* Ending- The writer wrote an ending that connected to the beginning or the middle of the story. 
-The writer used action, dialogue, or feeling to bring his story to a close.  
* Organization-The writer used paragraphs to separate the different parts or times of the story or to show when a new character was speaking.   
Development
*Elaboration- The writer added more to the heart of his story, including not only actions and dialogue but also thoughts and feelings. 
*Craft- The writer showed why characters did what they did by including their thinking. 
-The writer made some parts of the story go quickly, some slowly.
-The writer included precise and sometimes sensory details and used figurative language (simile, metaphor, personification) to bring her story to life. 
-The writer used a storytelling voice and conveyed the emotion or tone of her story through descriptions, phrases, dialogue, and thoughts.
Language Conventions
*Spelling- The writer used what he knew about word families and spelling rules to help him spell and edit.  He used the word wall and dictionaries when needed. 
*Punctuation-When writing long, complex sentences, the writer used commas to make them clear and correct.   
Rubric for Opinion Writing
Structure
* Overall- The writer made a claim about a topic or a text and tried to support her reasons. 
* Lead- The writer wrote a few sentences to hook his readers, perhaps by asking a question, explaining why the topic mattered, telling a surprising fact, or giving background information. 
-The writer stated his claim.
* Transitions-The writer used words and phrases to glue parts of her piece together.  She used phrases such as for example, another example, one time, and for instance to show when she wanted to shift from saying reasons to giving evidence and in addition to, also, and another to show when she wanted to make a new point. 
* Ending- The writer wrote an ending for his piece in which he restated and reflected on his claim, perhaps suggesting an action or response based on what he had written. 
* Organization-The writer separated sections of information using paragraphs. 
Development
*Elaboration- The writer gave reasons to support his opinion. He chose the reasons to convince his readers. 
-The writer included examples and information to support his reasons, perhaps from a text, his knowledge, or his life. 
*Craft- The writer made deliberate word choices to convince her readers, perhaps by emphasizing or repeating words that made readers feel emotions.
-If it felt right to do so, the writer chose precise details and facts to help make her points and use figurative language to draw readers into her line of thought.
-The writer made choices about which evidence was best to include or not include to support her points. 
-The writer used a convincing tone.
Language Conventions
*Spelling- The writer used what he knew about word families and spelling rules to help him spell and edit.  He used the word wall and dictionaries to help him when needed. 
*Punctuation-When writing long, complex sentences, the writer used commas to make them clear and correct.
-The writer used periods to fix her run-on sentences. 
Rubric for Informational Writing
Structure
* Overall- The writer taught readers different things about a subject.  She put facts, details, quotes, and ideas into each part of my writing. 
* Lead- The writer hooked his readers by explaining why the subject mattered, telling a surprising fact, or giving a big picture.  He let readers know that he would teach them different things about a subject.
* Transitions-The writer used words in each section that helped readers understand how one piece of information connected with others.  If she wrote this section in sequence, she used words and phrases such as before, later, next, then, and after.  If she organized the section in kinds or parts, she used words such as another, also, and for example.
* Ending- The writer wrote an ending that reminded readers of his subject and may have suggested a follow-up action or left readers with a final incite. He added his thoughts, feelings, and questions about the subject at the end.
* Organization-The writer grouped information into sections and used paragraphs and sometimes chapters to separate those sections. Each section had information that was mostly about the same thing.  She may have used headings and subheadings.
Development
*Elaboration- The writer taught his readers different things about the subject.  He chose those subtopics because they were important and interesting. 
-The writer included different kind of facts and details such as numbers, names, and examples. 
-The writer got his information from talking to people, reading books, and from his own knowledge and observations. 
-The writer made choices about organization.   He might have used compare/contrast, cause/effect, or pro/con.  He may have used diagrams, charts, headings, bold words, and definition boxes to help teach his readers.
*Craft- The writer made deliberate word choices to teach her readers.  She may have done this by using and repeating key words about her topic. 
-When it felt right to do so, the writer chose interesting comparisons and used figurative language to clarify her points. 
-The writer made choices about which information was best to include or not include.
-The writer used a teaching tone.  To do so, she may have used phrases such as that means…, what that really means is…, and let me explain…. 
Language Conventions
*Spelling- The writer used what he knew about word families and spelling rules to help him spell and edit.  He used the word wall and dictionaries to help him when needed. 
*Punctuation-When writing long, complex sentences, the writer used commas to make them clear and correct.
 
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